Recent comments

Bendrix B.

Railroad sued over grizzly bear deaths in Montana - posted 6 days ago

If you despise yourself and mankind, then you’ll try to dismantle all Man’s works. Slow the trains down enough and it won’t be worth running them. Tax energy production enough and there won’t be any. These people are sick. They just want to bomb us all back to the stone age and its our legal system they are abusing to do it.

Bendrix B.

Does outdoor recreation impact wildlife? - posted 1 month ago

Hey Seth, I did some digging because your response left the impression that the situation in Europe is more uniform than it is, and less contentious than that in the USA. So, for the USA readers, here are some facts.

Germany: There are no black bears at all. Some few years ago a single brown bear, the first in 150 years, wandered into Germany. It tore up bee hives and some livestock. Attempts to run it out were futile so a “hunting season” was opened, and the bear got hunted. It’s still in Germany, in a museum. The news media named it Bruno. You mentioned bears in the Alps in a sentence referring to Eastern Germany. That’s a bit confusing. There are no bears in the German Alps, perhaps a few in Switzerland.

There are wolves and lots of predation. There is a lot of pressure to delist them and allow hunting, just like here. My friend said some words in German that are well understood here; translated, it is “Shoot, shovel and shut up”. German farmers and hunters don’t care much for wolves. Wildlife in general are very tightly controlled in Germany. For example, red deer are not tolerated outside of certain areas. If they wander, they are killed.

Romania: Lots of bears, and lots of problems. Couple of years ago animal rights activists convinced the populace to outlaw brown bear hunting. Now there is a lot of pressure to legalize it because when the bears that are not afraid of people are not hunted, they thrive, and people suffer.

In all of Scandinavia there are large populations of brown bears and wolves (with one exception). Bears are hunted heavily in Scandinavia, with dogs. It’s a very popular hunt and any bear incautious enough to be curious about, or bother with humans, is quickly dispatched by hunters. They use the same dogs that are used to run down and hunt moose. Now that’s a big difference from North America. Wolves also are hunted heavily and avoid people as a result. The one exception to large wolf populations is where Sami people roam with their reindeer. The Sami exterminate wolves whenever and wherever they find them. As Indigenous People, they can do as they please. Big smirk on my face as I observe that the Sami are living in harmony with nature whereas white folks exterminating creatures to protect crops and stock are murderous depredators.

So there is a bit of the situation in Europe, which is not one place any more than the USA is one ecosystem. Where predators are allowed to predate at will, there are problems, where they are not, there is coexistence. In some places the predators were removed long ago and have not returned. The more you know about it the more it sounds just like the USA.

Rather than tell hikers to stay off the trails we should hunt bears and wolves. Those that habituate the trails and areas of human use will quickly expire. Those that don’t will prosper.

Bendrix B.

Does outdoor recreation impact wildlife? - posted 1 month ago

Seth, I have a friend who is a hunter in Germany and has hunted all over Europe. I vetted your comment with him and he agreed, where there is public land there is multiple use. And in Sweden, for example, the law Allemansratten, allows one to cross, collect certain flora and pitch a tent on private land. However, he also told me that dangerous predators are extirpated or managed so aggressively as to preclude human interaction. You are comparing apples to oranges in your comment on this article, this problem and the situation in the USA.

By the way, thank you very much for your suggestions on lotteries in the Wyoming article.

Bendrix B.

Organizations unite against CO wolf reintroduction initiative - posted 1 month ago

It’s nice to see that Tim Ferris, one of the most apt bullshitters of my generation is in favor of wolf introduction. Makes me wonder what new book or film he’s working on that he needs the wolf lovers to purchase. Remember, this is the guy who named his first book, “The Four Hour Work Week”, not because it was a practical bit of advice, but because his tests of book titles shot that one to the top of the list. Disappointing that his BS has to exploit what will become another predator introduction without a management plan disaster.

Bendrix B.

How to purchase Wyoming preference points - posted 1 month ago

So if I put in for sheep points at $150 annually and it takes 25 years to be in the running, that’s $3,750, and I’ll be 89. Might make more sense to attend sheep show and purchase chances of >1 for 10 years. I’d have more fun for sure!