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Application Strategy 2022: Utah elk and antelope

Photo credit: Getty Images

Utah's 2022 elk and antelope application overview

Jump to: NEW FOR 2022 State Information Draw System Elk Breakdown Antelope Breakdown

Note: The application deadline for all Utah species is March 3, 2022 at 11 p.m. MST. Applicants wishing to purchase preference and/or bonus points have until March 17, 2022 at 11 p.m. MST. You may apply online here.


New for 2022

  • New restrictions for trail cameras and baiting. See article links below:
  • Utah Wildlife Board bans trail camera usage for big game hunting
  • Utah to ban big game baiting
  • Unlimited any bull elk permits available to youth hunters. Those permits will go on sale July 14, 2022.
  • Some unit boundaries and unit names may have been changed for 2022. See the 2022 Utah big game guidebook for more information.
  • New child support law now in effect: As of July 1, 2021, there are restrictions on fishing and hunting license purchasers for non-payment of child support. See the 2022 Utah big game guidebook for more information.
  • General season archery elk permits will go on sale July 12, 2022.
  • General season rifle and muzzleloader any bull elk permits will go on sale July 14, 2022.
  • General season spike bull rifle and muzzleloader elk permits will go on sale July 26, 2022.
  • New muzzleloader antelope hunt for the South Slope, Vernal unit, Sept. 28 to Oct. 6, 2022.

Your goHUNT INSIDER account also has the NEW Point Tracker feature. This allows you to enter the number of points you have for each state and species and, as you research through Filtering 2.0 and Draw Odds, your point total will automatically be highlighted.


State Information

To view important information and an overview of Utah’s rules/regulations, the draw system and bonus points, tag and license fees and an interactive boundary line map, check out our State Profile. You can also view the Utah Elk Profile to access historical and statistical data to help you find trophy areas.

Utah State Profile Utah Elk Profile Utah Antelope Profile goHUNT Maps Draw Odds Filtering 2.0

Important dates and information

  • The deadline to apply is March 3, 2022 at 11 p.m. MST. Apply online here.
  • Applicants can also apply via telephone by calling any Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (UDWR) office.
  • The bonus point/preference point only purchase and application withdrawal deadline is March 17, 2022 at 11 p.m. MST.
  • Applicants can withdraw their application at no additional cost until March 17, 2022.
  • Results will be emailed or available online on or shortly before May 31, 2022.
  • Hunters must have a valid hunting or combination hunting/fishing license to apply.
  • Hunting licenses are valid for 365 days from the date of purchase. If you time it correctly you can apply for two consecutive years on one license. You do not need an active hunting license to hunt, just to apply.
  • Applicants must be 12 years old by Dec. 31, 2022 to apply.
  • Hunters must be 12 years old to hunt.
  • Hunters born after Dec. 31, 1965 must have taken an approved hunter’s education course.
  • Withdrawing or correcting an application is allowed before the application deadline. Corrections are made by withdrawing an application and submitting a new one. Be aware: you will be charged the $10 application fee again to make adjustments and reapply.
  • Group applications are allowed. Up to four applicants can apply together as a group for limited entry elk and antelope. 
  • Nonresidents may apply and build bonus points for all available species.
  • Residents may only apply for one limited entry species: elk, antelope or deer. They may also apply for one once-in-a-lifetime species: moose, bighorn sheep, mountain goat or bison. They can also apply for general season deer and the dedicated hunter program if they are not already enrolled.
  • If you draw a limited entry elk permit, you may not apply again for five years.
  • If you draw a limited entry antelope permit, you may not apply again for two years.

Utah elk and antelope fees 2022

Item Resident Nonresident
365-day
hunting license
$11 youth (13 and under)
$16 youth (14 to 17)
$34 adult (18 to 64)
$25 adult (65 and older)
$29 youth (14 to 17)
$72 adult (18 and older)
365-day hunt/fish
combination license
$20 youth (14 to 17)
$38 adult (18 to 64)
29 adult (65 and older)
$33 youth (17 and under)
$98 adult (18 and under)
App fee
per species
$10 $15
Limited entry elk $285 $1,000
Multi-season limited entry elk $513 $1,800
Limited entry antelope $55 $337

Note: Applicants need to buy either a hunting license or combination hunting/fishing license to apply. Applicants will not be charged the cost of the permit unless they are successful in the draw.


The Utah Draw System

Hunting license to apply

Every applicant will need to have a valid hunting license to apply for hunts or even bonus points only. That hunting license is valid for 365 days from the date of purchase. Applicants can buy one hunting license every two years and apply if they time it correctly. For example, if you purchase a hunting license and apply on the last day of this application period and then apply early in next year's application period, you could apply for two years on one hunting license. You do not need a valid hunting license to actually hunt; you only need it to apply in the draw.

The permit split offers 90% to residents and 10% to nonresidents.

Utah has a hybrid draw system for limited entry elk and antelope permits where they allocate 50% of the permits for each hunt to the applicants with the most bonus points and 50% are randomly allocated. The random draw takes into consideration the number of points each applicant has, meaning you get more chances in the random draw with each point you have. For example, if I have no points I get one chance, if I have ten points I get eleven chances (one for each point I have and one for this year’s application). If there is an odd number of permits, for example, three, the bulk go to high point holders and only one will be randomly allocated. If there is one permit only, it will be randomly drawn.

Bonus points are given for each year an applicant applies for a limited entry or once-in-a-lifetime species and is unsuccessful in the draw. Applicants can also apply for bonus points only until March 17 at 11:00 PM. Bonus points are species specific, meaning you cannot apply bonus points for limited entry elk that an applicant has accrued toward a limited entry deer or antelope hunt.

Group applications

Applicants can apply as a group for limited entry elk and antelope. Up to four applicants can apply on a group application. Group applicants will have their bonus points totaled and averaged and rounded down to the whole number. For example, if a group of three applies with three, five and nine bonus points, that application will go into the draw with five points (3+5+9=17/3=5.666 rounded to 5). Residents and nonresidents can apply as a group together on the same application. A group application is treated as a single application in the draw, meaning that if an application is successful in the draw, all applicants on that application will receive permits. Be aware that Utah will not over allocate their permit quotas to satisfy a group application. For example, if there is one permit remaining for any given hunt and a group application of two is drawn, they will bypass that application and move to the next single applicant. For resident/nonresident combo group applications, there must be enough nonresident permits to cover the nonresident applicants on the application. If there were an application with two nonresidents and two resident applicants and there was only one nonresident permit available for the hunt they applied for, that application has no chance at being successful in the draw. 

Hunt choices

Applicants can select two hunt choices when applying for limited entry hunts. Every single applicant's first choice is considered before moving to any applicant's second choice. Essentially, it is very rare for a limited entry permit to be drawn as a second choice. To draw a hunt as a second choice, it would mean that there were permits remaining after every single applicant's first choice was considered. The one elk hunt unit that has been drawn in the past as a second choice is the Cache, Meadowville. That unit is almost entirely private land and does provide a good hunt for individuals who are willing to go on a guided hunt with an outfitter who has access to that property. This unit is not a good DIY opportunity. If you pursue this unit, we highly recommend that applicants have a guided hunt booked there before applying. Be aware that if you draw a permit as a second choice you will lose any accumulated bonus points.

Draw order:

Utah’s draw goes in the following order from first to last:

  1. Buck deer (multi-season premium limited entry, premium limited entry, multi-season limited entry, limited entry, Cooperative Wildlife Management Unit (CWMU) and management buck deer)
  2. Bull elk (multi-season limited entry, limited entry and CWMU)
  3. Buck antelope (limited entry and CWMU)
  4. Once-in-a-lifetime species (bighorn sheep, moose, mountain goat and bison)
  5. General buck deer (lifetime license holders)
  6. General buck deer (dedicated hunters)
  7. General buck deer (youth)
  8. General buck deer
  9. Youth any bull elk

Utah does not allow applicants to draw multiple limited entry tags in the same draw/year. You also cannot draw a limited entry and a once-in-a-lifetime (moose, bighorn sheep, mountain goat or bison) permit in the same year. In the rare case that an applicant has enough points to draw both a limited entry permit and a once-in-a-lifetime permit, they should decide which hunt they want to pursue. With the order of the draw, they would draw the limited entry hunt and their once-in-a-lifetime species application will not be considered in the draw.

Permit return

Successful applicants who wish to return a permit that they have drawn can do so 30 days prior to the start of their hunt. In this case, they can have their bonus points reinstated; however, they would not earn one for that year's application. The cost of the permit will be refunded as long as it is returned 30 days prior to the hunt. If applicants drew a permit as part of a group, all members of the group must surrender their permits in order to have all of the applicants’ bonus points reinstated. Hunting licenses and application fees are nonrefundable.


Snowpack and drought in Utah

This winter has been much better so far. Utah still needs a few good snowstorms and some spring rain to help habitat improve, but it’s better than it was in 2021. The state is still in a drought, but it’s less severe and, with some added moisture, it will improve range conditions for herds. As it currently stands, we are optimistic that it could be a good year for antler growth. It’s not likely to be an outstanding year, but definitely better than 2021.

2022

Utah snow water equivalent update as of February 7, 2022. Source: National Resources Conservation Service
 

2022 Utah drought monitor status as of February 1. Source: United States Drought Monitor

2021

Utah snow water equivalent from February 9, 2021. Source: National Resources Conservation Service

2021 Utah drought monitor status from January 11. Source: United States Drought Monitor


Utah's 2022 elk breakdown

Utah is well established as one of the premier states for trophy quality elk in the West, although the overall quality throughout the state is not what it once was. In reality, the allure of the state still hangs on its reputation, which was established in the good ol’ days from about the year 2003 to 2010. That window in time produced a large quantity of legitimate trophy caliber bulls. Since then, things have changed. Spike elk hunts were integrated across almost all of the limited entry units to control the bull to cow ratios while still retaining a good number of older age class bulls. Additionally, many new hunts were added to most units, including late season rifle hunts and, in some cases, mid-October rifle hunts. The added opportunity has helped a bit in moving more applicants through the system and the spike hunt is very popular for over-the-counter (OTC) elk hunters. The flip side of those additional opportunities is that the quality has slipped. There are still really big bulls that inhabit almost every limited entry unit, but that class of bull is the exception rather than the norm. A 330” to 340” class bull is much more likely than the 350” to 380” class bull that most hunters expect to see. 

Utah’s elk trophy potential does not seem to hinge on the amount of snowpack and moisture as much as the more arid states like Arizona, New Mexico or, even, Nevada. Even in years where the moisture is below normal, there are still good bulls throughout most of the central and northern units. The current snowpack is above average with most of the state being over 100% of average. Utah is not yet back to normal conditions and the drought index is still showing dry conditions overall; however, so far, 2021/2022 has been better than last year and we are optimistic for great growth and trophy caliber bulls this fall. 

Utah has a bonus point system and the highest number of possible points is 29 going into this draw. About 13 years ago, Utah allowed nonresidents to apply for all limited entry and once-in-a-lifetime species rather than making them select one like they do residents. On the surface, this may seem like a good change, but it has resulted in point creep to the point that it’s become very hard to draw a bonus point permit unless you got into the game 15+ years ago. That’s the bad news. The good news is that 50% of the permits for each hunt are randomly allocated and you always have some change in the draw. It’s a minimal $15 application fee and the hunting license is among the cheapest in the West for nonresidents. 

Utah offers limited entry archey, muzzleloader, early rifle, late rifle and multi-season hunts. They also offer some October mid-season hunts in units with larger populations of elk. The multi-season hunts offer lucky tag holders the opportunity to hunt all hunts until they have filled their permit. The multi-season hunts are hard to draw, but represent a great opportunity to scout and hunt for a long period of time and harvest a great bull. In addition, some units have handgun, archery, muzzleloader, shotgun (HAMS) hunts. Those hunts have long season dates, but are in tougher units to hunt and you are limited to using a handgun, archery equipment, muzzleloader or a shotgun. 

Utah manages its elk hunts and herds by placing those into individual units. Most states manage their herds for desired populations, harvest success and bull to cow ratio. Utah manages their elk herds under those same parameters to some extent; however, they also manage their limited entry elk units for a desired age class. Age class is determined by analyzing teeth samples taken from harvested bulls each year. The average age over the running three year period guides the number of permits issued for each hunt unit. Below, we break down the units by age class objective and give last year's average and the three year running average age.

Utah bull elk age class objective 7.5 to 8 years

Unit 2020 average age Three year
average age
Beaver,  East 8.3 7.9
Plateau, Boulder 7.2 7.6
Book Cliffs, Little Creek 7.0 7.0
Fillmore, Pahvant 8.7 7.6
San Juan 7.8 7.9

 

Utah bull elk age class objective 6.5 to 7 years

Unit 2020 average age Three year
average age
Book Cliffs, Bitter Creek 5.9 6.1
Cache, South 6.0 5.9
Monroe 7.1 7.0
Mt Dutton 6.8 6.5
Panguitch Lake 5.7 6.2
South Slope, 
Diamond Mtn
7.8 7.3
Southwest Desert,
South
7.1 7.2

 

Utah bull elk age class objective 5.5 to 6 years

Unit 2020 average age Three year
average age
Central Mtns, Manti 6.8 6.5
Central Mtns, Nebo 6.7 6.1
La Sal, La Sal Mtns 6.2 5.9
North Slope,
Three Corners
4.8 5.2
Plateau, Fishlake 7.2 6.4
Wasatch 6.3 6.3

 

Utah bull elk age class objective 4.5 to 5 years

Unit 2020 average age Three year
average age
Box Elder, Grouse Creek 5.3 5.6
Box Elder, Pilot 7.2 6.7
Cache, North 4.7 4.6
Paunsaugunt 5.4 5.0


Hit list units for trophy Utah elk in 2022

Top hit list hunts to consider for 360" or better bulls

Unit Trophy
potential
Harvest
success
Resident points
to draw (2021)
Nonresident points
to draw (2021)
Beaver, East 380"+ Archery: 50%
Muzzleloader: 80%
Rifle: 91%
Late rifle: 100%
Multi: 50%
100% with 19
68% with 23
100% with 26
52% with 21
Random only
Random only
Random only
Random only
Random only
No permit
Plateau, Boulder 380"+ Archery: 43%
Muzzleloader: 92%
Rifle: 77%
Late rifle: 77%
Multi: 75%
77% with 16
64% with 22
100% with 24
54% with 18
26% with 26
100% with 24
Random only
100% with 26
100% with 21
No permit
San Juan 380"+ Archery: 44%
Muzzleloader: 100%
Rifle: 93%
Late rifle: 73%
Multi: 100%
30% with 17
24% with 23
100% with 26
100% with 19
20% with 26
100% with 24
Random only
14% with 25
100% with 23
No permit
Fillmore, Pahvant 380"+ Archery: 8%
Muzzleloader: 88%
Rifle: 76%
Late rifle: 58%
Multi: 100%
70% with 15
25% with 21
18% with 24
52% with 20
17% with 26
Random only
Random only
50% with 25
Random only
No permit
Monroe 370"+ Archery: 82%
Muzzleloader: 83%
Rifle: 100%
Late rifle: 100%
Multi: 100%
44% with 15
67% with 23
78% with 25
100% with 21
Random only
Random only
Random only
Random only
Random only
No permit
Panguitch Lake 360"+ Archery: 50%
Muzzleloader: 83%
Rifle: 94%
Late rifle: 86%
Multi: 100%
76% with 12
76% with 18
34% with 21
76% with 17
Random only
Random only
Random only
Random only
Random only
No permit
Mt Dutton 360"+ Archery: 29%
Muzzleloader: 73%
Rifle: 71%
Late rifle: 100%
Multi: 33%
43% with 9
39% with 17
67% with 21
100% with 19
100% with 24
100% with 19
Random only
Random only
Random only
No permit

Random odds vary by the number of bonus points. Review the odds within your INSIDER account.

Mid-tier elk hunts to consider for 2022

Unit Trophy
potential
Harvest
success
Resident points
to draw (2021)
Nonresident points
to draw (2021)
Book Cliffs,
Little Creek
360"+ Archery: 25%
Muzzleloader: 100%
Rifle: 100%
Multi: 100%
Random only
Random only
Random only
Random only
Random only
No permit
Random only
No permit
Central Mtns,
Manti
350"+ Archery: 33%
Muzzleloader: 80%
Rifle: 78%
Rifle: 78%
Late rifle: 82%
Multi: 87%
62% with 7
35% with 12
15% with 17
48% with 11
100% with 23
53% with 18
52% with 18
100% with 21
100% with 20
69% with 18
100% with 25
Southwest Desert,
South
350"+ Archery: 50%
Muzzleloader: 57%
Rifle: 90%
Late rifle: 64%
Multi: 67%
50% with 8
70% with 15
88% with 21
100% with 16
35% with 24
35% with 17
51% with 21
100% with 24
51% with 20
No permit
Central Mtns,
Nebo
350"+ Archery: 64%
Muzzleloader: 86%
Rifle: 94%
Late rifle: 73%
Multi: 100%
38% with 9
24% with 13
61% with 21
100% with 13
100% with 25
Random only
Random only
100% with 22
Random only
No permit
Plateau, Fishlake 340"+ Archery: 33%
Muzzleloader: 79%
Rifle: 85%
Rifle: 62%
Late rifle: 92%
Multi: 100%
92% with 7
60% with 12
88% with 16
27% with 11
69% with 14
52% with 21
28% with 17
100% with 19
100% with 17
22% with 21
35% with 18
Random only
Cache, South 340"+ Archery: 33%
Muzzleloader: 0%
Rifle: 87%
Late rifle: 88%
Multi: 50%
100% with 11
34% with 16
45% with 18
100% with 16
Random only
Random only
Random only
Random only
Random only
No permit
Book Cliffs,
Bitter Creek
340"+ Archery: 10%
Muzzleloader: 63%
Rifle: 77%
Late rifle: 48%
Multi: 80%
72% with 7
41% with 14
21% with 19
78% with 13
34% with 20
35% with 17
100% with 22
100% with 23
100% with 17
No permit
Wasatch 340"+ Archery: 18%
Muzzleloader: 68%
Rifle: 71%
Rifle: 64%
Late rifle: 71%
Multi: 79%
52% with 5
83% with 10
64% with 15
65% with 11
48% with 10
88% with 21
29% with 11
35% with 15
100% with 13
74% with 19
69% with 15
100% with 22
La Sal, La Sal Mtns 340"+ Archery: 23%
Muzzleloader: 81%
Rifle: 67%
Late rifle: 56%
Multi: 25%
55% with 5
34% with 10
70% with 14
76% with 8
100% with 21
100% with 17
52% with 19
35% with 21
100% with 15
No permit
Box Elder, Pilot 340"+ Archery: NA
Rifle: 100%
100% with 13
84% with 20
No permit
Random only

 

Intriguing elk hunt options for low point applicants

Unit Trophy
potential
Harvest
success
Resident points
to draw (2021)
Nonresident points
to draw (2021)
La Sal, La Sal Mtns 340"+ Archery: 23% 55% with 5 100% with 17
Nine Mile, Anthro 340"+ Archery: 25% 50% with 5 100% with 10
Oquirrh, Stansbury 330"+ Archery: 0% 35% with 5 Random only
Paunsaugunt 330"+ Archery: 20%
Muzzleloader: 36%
42% with 3
42% with 4
100% with 18
Random only
Wasatch 340"+ Archery: 18% 52% with 5 29% with 11
Cache, North 330"+ Archery: 29% 100% with 8 54% with 8
Box Elder,
Sawtooth
340"+ Archery: NA 100% with 8 Random only
North Slope,
Three Corners
350"+ Archery: 43% 100% with 8 Random only

INSIDERS should use the draw odds portion of their INSIDER account to research their odds at their point level. Remember that every applicant has a chance in the draw no matter how many points they have. Apply for hunts; you will get a bonus point if you do not draw. You never know when you will be the lucky applicant that draws a permit of a lifetime! 

Archery and HAMS hunts

Utah offers archery hunts; however, you should be aware that, for most units, the hunt dates begin in late August and end on Sept. 16. The early start dates of that hunt can be good for hunting early season pre-rut bulls that are mostly still in bachelor herds. By the end of the hunt, the bulls will have or will be transitioning into the rut. The hunt dates typically do not offer the best rut hunt as it ends prior to the rut getting good. In 2021, Utah offered some new hunts on the Box Elder/Sawtooth, Cache/North, Nine Mile/Anthro, Oquirrh-Stansbury, Plateau/Barney Top/Kaiparowits, Southwest Desert/North and West Desert/DeepCreek. The archery hunts in these units ran from Sept. 1 to 30 and were the first hunts Utah has ever offered for bowhunters that were in the heart of the rut. These same units also offered a HAMS hunt from Oct. 1 to Nov. 15. 

Looking at the draw odds, those hunts required more points than I would have anticipated. Harvest statistics have not been released, but the rumor is that those were relatively tough hunts and did not produce many good bulls. We do know that there will be both resident and nonresident permits available in the draw except for the Box Elder, Sawtooth, which will only have resident permits. If you decide on one of these hunts, an outfitter is a good idea for nonresidents or residents who may not have the time to scout.

The HAMS and archery hunts on these units are intriguing, but they may not be a good fit for everyone. Populations and trophy potential are average within these areas.

OTC elk hunt options

The OTC elk hunts are rarely talked about, but there are hunts available for people who just want to hunt elk. Utah offers OTC elk hunts under two different categories: general any bull and general spike elk. There are archery, rifle, muzzleloader and, even, multi-season permits.

The general archery permits are not specific to a unit and hunters who purchase those can hunt either spike elk units and/or any bull units. Archery hunters can harvest a spike or cow elk on almost every spike elk unit or they can harvest any bull or a cow elk on any bull units. The number of archery general season permits is unlimited.

Rifle and muzzleloader hunters must choose between buying a spike elk permit or any bull permit. Rifle hunters or muzzleloader hunters who buy a general spike tag can harvest a spike only. General any bull elk rifle or muzzleloader permits are only valid for bull elk on general any bull units. The number of any bull and spike rifle/muzzleloader permits is capped. If you plan to obtain one of these permits, we would suggest that you plan on purchasing the day they go on sale.

The largest elk herds inhabiting general season areas are in the Unitas units in northeast Utah. Those units also have the most public land and access.

General archery, muzzleloader, rifle any bull and spike only hunts

Item OTC sale date Resident
cost
Nonresident
cost
General archery
elk permit
July 12, 2022 $50 $593
General any bull
elk permit
July 14, 2022 $50 $593
General multi-season any
bull elk permit
July 14, 2022 $150 $800
General spike elk permit July 26, 2022 $50 $593
General multi-season
spike elk permit
July 26, 2022 $150 $800

INSIDERS can explore the general season any bull and spike elk hunts in Utah by selecting Utah under Filtering 2.0 . They can then select Elk, Any Bull or Elk, Spike to research the units, harvest success, season dates and public land percentages to help them fine tune their search for an OTC elk hunt opportunity.

Managing elk points and expectations

2022 maximum bonus points for elk: 29

No one applied for a hunt with more than 27 in 2021.

 

Utah's 2022 antelope breakdown

Historically, Utah has not been among the top states for antelope hunting — both in terms of populations and trophy potential. However, the harvest success is really high even for the archery hunts. Utah offers archery, muzzleloader and rifle hunts and the bulk of the available hunts are primarily public land. Hunters are not likely to kill the buck of their lifetime, but the opportunity to have a fun hunt on public land is very good. Most nonresident applicants are buying a hunting license to be able to apply for deer, elk and once-in-a-lifetime species and may not consider antelope. We highly suggest nonresidents also apply for antelope for the minimal $15 application fee. With half of the permits randomly allocated, you might as well throw your application in the draw.

Resident applicants have to pick the limited entry species that they apply for. They cannot apply for limited entry deer, elk and antelope in the same year. In our opinion, we recommend resident applicants pick either limited entry elk or deer until they draw and only apply for limited entry antelope in the years where they are on a waiting period for the other species. Of course, there are those of you who are just antelope enthusiasts and, in that case, apply for antelope!

Most recent antelope populations and trends

Unit 2020
population
Buck:doe
ratio
Trending
Beaver 271* 50:100 Up
Book Cliffs,
Bitter Creek
264 28:100 Down
Book Cliffs,
South
431 31:100 Down
Box Elder 726 30:100 Up
Box Elder,
Puddle Valley
164 31:100 Up
Cache/Morgan-North
South Rich/Ogden
479 46:100 Down
Fillmore, Black Rock
Desert
567 54:100 Down
La Sal, South
Cisco
255 45:100 Down
Morgan, South Rich 479 46:100 Down
Mt Dutton, 
Pausaugunt
336 38:100 Up
Nine Mile, Anthro 514 51:100 Up
Nine Mile, Range
Creek
197 14:100 Down
North Slope, Three Corners,
West Daggett
585 44:100 Down
Panguitch Lake 317 34:100 Up
Pine Valley 337* 46:100 Up
Plateau 682 31:100 Down
San Juan, Hatch Point 113 24:100 Down
San Rafael, Desert 197 23:100 Up
San Rafael, North 948 55:100 Down
South Slope, Bonanza,
Diamond Mtn
402 34:100 Down
South Slope, Vernal 328 118:100 Down
Southwest Desert 337* 35:100 Down
West Desert, Riverbed 723 58:100 Down
West Desert,
Rush Valley
481 59:100 Up
West Desert,
Snake Valley
328 36:100 Down

*Incomplete flight data in 2020. Other units were not flown for population counts in recent years. The population displayed is the most recent trend count.

Top units to consider for 75" or better antelope

Unit Trophy
potential
Harvest
success
Resident points
to draw (2021)
Nonresident points
to draw (2021)
San Rafael,
North
80" Archery: 77%
Muzzleloader: 100%
Rifle: 95%
100% with 3
63% with 4
29% with 8
Random only
100% with 13
50% with 18
Book Cliffs,
South
80" Archery: 60%
Rifle: 100%
43% with 2
47% with 6
Random only
100% with 17
Fillmore,
Oak Creek South
80" Archery: 100%
Muzzleloader: NA
Rifle: 96%
100% with 4
100% with 3
100% with 7
Random only
Random only
18% with 12
Beaver 80" Archery: 80%
Rifle: 100%
100% with 3
94% with 7
No permit
100% with 13
La Sal, Potash,
South Cisco
80" Archery: 100%
Rifle: 100%
100% with 4
45% with 5
No permit
100% with 13
West Desert,
Snake Valley
75" Archery: 89%
Rifle: 92%
100% with 4
53% with 8
Random only
100% with 13
West Desert,
Riverbed
75" Archery: 100%
Rifle: 97%
100% with 7
40% with 12
Random only
100% with 13
Nine Mile,
Anthro Myton Bench
75" Archery: 100%
Muzzleloader: 93%
Rifle: 100%
60% with 2
55% with 3
54% with 5
54% with 12
100% with 12
100% with 13
Panguitch Lake,
Zion North
75" Archery: 100%
Muzzleloader: 100%
Rifle: 94%
78% with 6
83% with 3
100% with 7
Random only
No permit
51% with 12
 

Conclusion

As previously noted, our recommendation for Utah residents is that they concentrate on other states for antelope like Wyoming, New Mexico, Montana, Idaho, Colorado, Nevada and Idaho. Utah is a great state for antelope, but it’s much better for limited entry elk and deer. We recommend applying for limited entry deer or elk until you have drawn a permit and then apply for antelope while you are in your waiting period for those other species. As you review the odds, you can see that within a five year period, there are many antelope hunts that can be drawn, especially for archery hunters. 

Nonresidents should apply for antelope in Utah for the minimal $15 application fee because it’s worth it to have your application in the draw and build bonus points if you are unsuccessful. There are many more hunts that were not included in the goHUNT HitList above — some of which have better odds. The reality is that a Boone & Crockett buck is rare even in the best units, so drawing a lesser known unit is not all that much of a sacrifice. Any antelope unit in the state is highly likely to offer you a fun hunt with a high rate of opportunity at success. Explore the draw odds, unti profiles and apply accordingly. Take special note of the archery and muzzleloader hunts as those are good hunts with high rates of success. Good luck in the draws!

Find your draw odds

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