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APPLICATION STRATEGY 2016: New Mexico Sheep & Exotics

Desert bighorn sheep front view
Photo credit: Shutterstock

New Mexico's sheep and exotics application overview

Jump to: New for 2016 State Information Draw System Rocky Bighorn Breakdown Desert Bighorn Breakdown Ibex Breakdown Oryx Breakdown Barbary Sheep Breakdown

New Mexico is one of the most diverse states when it comes to wildlife. While we have recently covered deer, elk, and antelope, if you are in search of desert bighorn sheep from a destination that holds some of the largest in the West, then look no further than New Mexico. There are also phenomenal hunting opportunities for Rocky Mountain bighorns and what truly sets New Mexico apart is the unique opportunities to pursue exotic species like ibex, oryx, and barbary sheep in this Land of Enchantment. This article will empower you with the information necessary to develop an effective plan for applying this year.

Note: The application deadline for New Mexico is March 23, 2016. You can apply online.



Why New Mexico for sheep and exotics

•  The two largest desert bighorn sheep entered in Boone and Crockett (B&C) over the last 25 years have come from New Mexico.
•  It is the only destination for free ranging ibex and oryx.
•  Barbary sheep offer a chance to hunt during the off-season months in winter and spring.
•  Hunting ibex with archery equipment in the Florida Mountains is one of the most challenging hunts anywhere.



New for 2016

•  New Mexico residents that are active military or veterans can now receive 50% off licenses, permits, and stamps.
•  Population management hunts for oryx on the White Sands Missile Range (Unit 19) are now available through the population management (fifth choice) option only.



State information

It is critical to fully understand the rules and regulations for any state that you apply for. This application strategy is in no way intended to replace or override the actual regulations found on the New Mexico Game and Fish Department's (NMGFD) website. The information that we provide serves as a guide to help you better understand how New Mexico manages their licenses and permits. It also gives you a summary of how their draw system works.

To view important information and an overview of New Mexico’s rules and regulations, the draw system, tag and license fees and an interactive boundary line map, check out our State Profile. You can also view the Species profiles to access historical and statistical data to help you find trophy areas.

State Profile Rocky Bighorn Profile Desert Bighorn Profile Ibex Profile Oryx Profile Barbary Sheep Profile

Important dates and information

•  The deadline to apply for desert sheep, Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep, oryx, ibex, and barbary sheep is March 23, 2016 by 5 p.m. Mountain Time.
•  You can apply online here.
•  Draw results will be available on the NMGFD website by April 27, 2016.
•  There are no bonus points or preference points in New Mexico.
•  A valid game hunting license must be purchased prior to applying.
•  Application and full license fees are charged at the time that the application is submitted.
•  Unsuccessful draw applicants will receive a full refund for the draw license, minus the application fee.
•  Unsuccessful draw applicants also may receive a full refund of the game hunting license fee if requested at the time of application.
•  The first three hunt choices are considered when an application is drawn.
•  If you enter a fourth choice, then you will be placed in a separate pool where permits are awarded for hunts that have not met their full number.
•  The fifth choice on the application indicates that you are willing to accept a population management hunt choice, which is often an antlerless permit.
•  You may not edit your application once submitted.
•  You can withdraw your application prior to the deadline, request a full refund (less the application fee), and then you can reapply.
•  You can mix sheep species on your sheep application choices.
•  New Mexico has a mandatory harvest reporting! Regardless of whether you harvest or not, you must report.

New Mexico state law has established the following quotas for draw hunts:

•  84% of draw licenses are awarded to New Mexico residents.
•  10% of draw licenses are awarded to residents and nonresidents applying with a New Mexico registered outfitter.
•  6% of draw licenses are awarded to nonresidents applying without a New Mexico registered outfitter.



The draw system

Understanding the draw

New Mexico requires that all applicants pay the full amount at the time of application. For the species in this write up, a nonresident tag fee is a hefty sum to many. For example, a nonresident bighorn sheep tag has a price tag of $3,173. Sending off that amount at the time of application discourages a lot of hunters, with many choosing not to apply. This can be viewed as a benefit to those that do apply because it simply raises their odds of drawing a tag.

You must purchase an annual big game hunting license in order to apply for a big game species. This license can be purchased online at the time of application or at any NMGFD office. The license is valid for the calendar year.

All draw applications are entered into an automated system that randomly assigns each application a sequence number. Based on this number, the system matches the first, second, and third choices on the application with available tags. If all choices have already been awarded, the system advances to the next application. New Mexico does not grant preference or bonus points to unsuccessful applicants. If an applicant selects a fourth choice hunt, that hunter will be placed in a second pool from which tags may be awarded if a hunt has not met its full number. Only successful applicants will be notified by email. An unsuccessful applicant will not be notified, but may check their NMDGF account online. For more information about the Draw Hunt System, click here.

If you want to improve your chances at drawing a tag and you are willing to hire an outfitter if you draw, then use our Outfitter Directory to find a New Mexico outfitter to contract with prior to the draw. The outfitter will then assist you in applying for the draw.

Here’s why that matters

The outfitter draw is truly your best chance to pick up a tag as a nonresident of New Mexico. If you are willing to hire an outfitter, then you should be applying through the outfitter draw. Remember to contact a licensed New Mexico outfitter prior to filling out an application.

Here is an example of the benefit of applying through the outfitter draw compared with the normal nonresident allocation.

Archery Ibex Hunt Code IBX-2-536

In 2015, there was a total of 100 tags issued for this hunt code. 84 of these tags were reserved for residents, six tags were designated for the nonresident unguided draw, and the remaining 10 tags were given to the nonresident applicants who contracted with an outfitter prior to applying. The table below shows that the odds of drawing a tag were over twice as good for those that applied in the outfitter draw compared to the nonresidents in the regular draw.

Ibex archery hunt code IBX-2-536

Type

Allocation

No. of
applicants
Tags/total
applications
Resident 84 672 12.5%
Nonresident (unguided) 6 111 5.4%
Outfitter draw 10 86 11.6%

 

Unlocking New Mexico’s system

Without a point system to gain preference over the years, it is important to have a complete understanding of how the draw works and understand draw odds for each of the seasons available for the species that you are applying for. Choice placement is important. Obviously, you should consider the most desired and probably most difficult to draw choice first. Your first choice should be followed by the next most desirable selection as your second choice with your third choice being one with the best odds. A fourth choice for these species is not necessary since all tags will have been distributed in the first pass (first pass considers choices one, two, and three only). The fourth choice also indicates that you would be willing to accept any undersubscribed hunt choice, but, with these specific species, there will never be an undersubscribed hunt choice.

One application for sheep

Although New Mexico has two bighorn sheep species available, there is only one application. You can mix and match your hunt choices between Rocky Mountain bighorn and desert sheep. It is also important to know that once you are drawn for a sheep tag, then that species of sheep is no longer available for you to apply for. For example, if you are successful in drawing a Rocky Mountain bighorn tag, then you will only be eligible to apply for desert sheep in the future.

Bighorn sheep raffle opportunity

Two tags will be raffled by NMDGF with the assistance of the New Mexico Chapter of the Wild Sheep Foundation: one tag for desert bighorn sheep and one for Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep. Raffle tickets must be purchased by midnight June 22, 2016. To purchase tickets contact Lanny Rominger: lanny.rominger@yahoo.com or (505) 821-5064. The raffle winner for desert bighorn sheep will choose one hunt from the desert bighorn hunts remaining after the auction winner has chosen his/her hunt. The raffle winner for Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep will choose one hunt from the Rocky Mountain bighorn hunts remaining after the auction winner has chosen his/her hunt. Hunt dates are Aug. 1 to Dec. 31, 2016, except in Unit 53 (Wheeler Peak), where the dates are Aug. 1 to 10, 2016 and Sept. 1 to Dec. 31, 2016.
 



New Mexico's Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep breakdown

Jeff Demaske New Mexico Rocky bighorn sheep taken with Frontier Outfitting

Jeff Demaske's Wheeler Peak New Mexico Rocky bighorn sheep taken with Frontier Outfitting — A goHUNT Business Member

The Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep in New Mexico are hunted in some very diverse terrain. The units in the north end of the state, like the Pecos hunt of Unit 45 and the Wheeler Peak hunt in Unit 53, are classic bighorn sheep habitat. These areas are high alpine, steep mountains that will require horseback or backpack to access the sheep. Other parts of the state have units that are not nearly as remote or as high of elevation, but rugged in their own right. The remoteness will require hunters to be prepared physically and mentally if they are drawn. The opportunity to draw a tag is truly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity in New Mexico so make the most of it if you are lucky enough to draw.

Current rocky bighorn herd condition

The bighorn units are managed very conservatively and decisions are made on a yearly basis to open or close areas to achieve management objectives. We simply cannot say enough positive things about the stellar job that New Mexico’s sheep biologists do managing their precious resource. Some of the units are completely public while others have a significant amount of private property. The units with private land have agreements in place that the NMGFD have negotiated with these landowners to bring sportsmen the opportunity to hunt bighorn sheep.

Average B&C score and age for New Mexico bighorn sheep
No average age reported for 2012.

The overall trophy size in New Mexico is great. Surprisingly, New Mexico is ranked fourth among the states in B&C entries since 2000. In fact, a ram was harvested in 2015 that scored an amazing 191”. There are many rams harvested across the units that provide a legitimate 170”+ opportunity to harvest.

Top Boone & Crockett rocky bighorn entries since 2000 by state

The seasons

The Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep seasons are offered as “any legal sporting arm,” which means that the tag holder can elect to hunt with any legal weapon. The weapon chosen must abide by the limitations set forth in the regulations.

The goHUNT hit list units for New Mexico rocky bighorns

As units are opened for the first time or re-opened after a temporary closure, old rams are generally available to hunters on these reintroduction years. This was the case in 2015 for a few areas. In 2015, a 190” plus ram was harvested in the Rio Grande Gorge hunt in Units 49, 50, and 53 as well as the Dry Cimarron hunt in Unit 58. These were both new hunt areas for 2015. In most years, the top producing areas are usually the Pecos hunt in Unit 45 and the Wheeler Peak hunt in Unit 53. These two areas have been available to public hunting for many years and have a stable population of sheep with an abundance of mature rams.

Top hunt units to consider for 160” or better
Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep

(not in order of quality)

Unit

Trophy
Potential

Pecos hunt area Unit 45 180"+
Wheeler Peak hunt area Unit 53 170”+
Latir hunt area Units 53, 55 170”+
Rio Grande Gorge hunt area Unit 49, 50, 53 170”+
San Francisco River/Turkey Creek
hunt area Unit 16B, 22, 23, 24
170”+
Dry Cimarron hunt area Unit 58 170”+

 


 

How to uncover hidden gem rocky bighorn units

We list the trophy potential of the hunt areas within the bighorn units above for you. While all of the units are truly capable of providing a chance at harvesting a 170” or better ram, some do it with more regularity. Utilize our Unit Profiles to find a history of the bighorn sheep hunts within the unit. This account will not indicate a trend in trophy quality, but it will provide a historical look at the longevity of that herd. While some of the newly opened, or re-opened herds are alluring, they can also prove to be risky. These new units do not have as many past hunters to gather information from.

New Mexico's top B&C producing counties since
2010 for Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep

County

No. of
entries

Units found within county

Taos 12 45, 49, 50, 53, 55A
Mora 2 45, 49
Catron 1 16B, 22, 23

 

How to apply for a Rocky Mountain bighorn tag in New Mexico

Remember if you are interested in hunting Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep this year that you will need to list the hunt code BHS-1-201 as one of your three sheep choices. Once you list this hunt code, then you will be able to select three choices from the various Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep hunt areas and hunt dates. An example application from the NMGFD website is shown below. Notice that this example shows the Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep hunt code as the first choice on the application along with the hunt area choices.

New Mexico bighorn sheep application process
 


 

The point system or lack thereof

As mentioned, New Mexico does not utilize a point system for any of their big game species. This is great news to the first time applicant because it is never too late to jump in the race. The playing field is even and this creates hope for all, much like a raffle drawing.

Managing expectations

Prepare yourself; you will need a lot of patience. The odds are that you will never draw a tag, but we all know that someone will. You will also need to be prepared to send off a large amount of money each year to apply even though nearly all of it is refundable. Remember that one thing is for certain: you cannot draw if you do not apply.

Find your draw odds



New Mexico's desert bighorn sheep breakdown

Gary New Mexico desert bighorn taken with Frontier Outfitting

Gary's 183" New Mexico desert bighorn taken with Frontier Outfitting — A goHUNT Business Member

New Mexico has been a great story for desert bighorn sheep. For years the desert sheep hunts were conducted in Unit 27 on the Peloncillo Mountains. This was also the only destination available for nonresidents to hunt desert sheep until 2012 when it all changed. In 2012, several new areas opened for the first time ever and with that came a flood of older age class ram harvests. For two years, the “cream” was largely skimmed off the herd in these new areas, but many mature rams still exist. Although we may never again see a statewide average harvest score like we did for those two seasons, the statewide average is still very impressive at approximately 166” in 2015.

Current desert bighorn sheep herd condition

The overall condition of the desert sheep herds remains stable. Again, stellar management is the reason behind this success. After the recent hunts ended, there are still reports of many mature rams alive that are eight years or older with horns scoring well over 165” B&C. Those lucky enough to draw a tag in 2016 are in for a great year.

Average B&C score and age for New Mexico desert bighorn sheep

The seasons

The desert bighorn sheep seasons are offered as “any legal sporting arm,” which means that the tag holder can elect to hunt with any legal weapon. The weapon chosen must abide by the limitations set forth in the regulations.

The goHUNT hit list units for New Mexico desert bighorn sheep

So many desert sheep units are capable of producing a dream ram, but a few hunt areas within the units are proven to be consistent producers. Listed below are what we consider to be among the best of class for New Mexico 2016.

Top hunt units to consider for 160” or better
desert bighorn sheep

(not in order of quality)

Unit

Trophy
Potential

Ladrones hunt area Unit 13 & 17 170”+
Peloncillo hunt area in Unit 27 175”+
Hatchets hunt area (early and late) Unit 26 165”+
Caballos hunt area (early and late) Unit 20 165”+
San Andres hunt area Unit 19 175”+
Fra Cristobal hunt area Unit 20 165”+


How to uncover hidden gem desert bighorn units

The truth is that all of New Mexico’s desert sheep hunt areas are capable of fulfilling dreams of a 160”+ ram. What makes a unit a true gem is finding the hunt choice that fits your needs and specific criteria. Read through the Unit Profiles to settle on an area that meets your physical requirements or limitations.

New Mexico's top B&C producing counties since
2010 for desert bighorn sheep

County

No. of
entries

Units found
within county

Hidalgo 7 26, 27
Sierra 4 17, 19, 20
Socorro 3 13, 17, 19, 20
Grant 1 26
Otero 1 19

 

Top 10 Boone and Crockett Desert bighorn sheep entries

 

Rank

Location

Score

Year 

1 Lower Calif., MX 205 1/8" 1940
2 Pima County, AZ 201 3/8" 1982
3 Lower Calif., MX 197 4/8" 1892
4 Graham County, AZ 197 4/8" 1988
5 Socorro County, NM 195 3/8" 2013
6 Baja Calif., MX 192 5/8" 1979
7 Baja Calif., MX 191 6/8" 1968
8 Mexico 191 3/8" 1952
9 Baja Calif., MX 191 2/8" 1982
10 Baja Calif., MX 191 1/8" 1981

 

How to apply for a desert bighorn tag in New Mexico

 

Similar to the method of applying for Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep, you will need to list the hunt code BHS-1-204 as one of your three sheep choices if you would like to apply for desert sheep on your sheep application. Once you list this hunt code, then you will be able to select three choices from the various desert bighorn sheep hunt areas and hunt dates. Remember that you can select either desert or Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep as your first or second choices.



The point system or lack thereof

As mentioned, New Mexico does not utilize a point system for any of their big game species. This is great news to the first time applicant because it is never too late to jump in the race. The playing field is even and this creates hope for all, much like a raffle drawing.

Managing expectations

Prepare yourself to have a lot of patience. The odds are that you will never draw a tag, but we all know that someone will. You will need to also be prepared to send off a large amount of money each year to apply. Fortunately, nearly all of it is refundable. Remember that one thing is for certain: you cannot draw if you do not apply.

Find your draw odds



New Mexico's ibex breakdown
 

New Mexico Ibex taken with Mangas Outfitters
New Mexico Ibex taken with Mangas Outfitters — A goHUNT Business Member

Quickly gaining popularity among Western big game hunters is New Mexico’s unique opportunity to pursue ibex. Persian ibex are found exclusively in Unit 25 in the Florida Mountains on the southern edge of the state and are sure to challenge the most skilled of hunters. The terrain they live in is among the most unforgiving of any mountain hunt in the Lower 48. There are various seasons along with different weapon types to select from.

Current ibex herd condition

The ibex numbers have continued to rise in recent years despite state efforts to reduce them with the implementation of their population management hunt geared toward harvesting females and immature ibex. Predation is rarely an issue and the numbers are conservatively managed by the NMGFD, which means that the overall health of the herd is in great shape.

New Mexico any legal weapon harvest
New Mexico archery harvest
New Mexico muzzleloader harvest

The seasons

What really makes the ibex season selection interesting is the fact that you can apply for various weapon types. There are two archery choices with different season dates to select from. There is also a once-in-a-lifetime rifle option, which is the most sought after of all the ibex hunt choices. There is also a muzzleloader option that is quickly gaining popularity among applicants due to New Mexico’s very liberal muzzleloader restrictions. Muzzleloaders can be equipped with any scope, propellant, or projectile, making them hardly primitive. The season dates are scattered from mid-October through January, depending on the weapon type. Refer to the Unit Profile for Unit 25 to see the various dates offered.

 

 

How to improve your odds of drawing for ibex

The key to hunting ibex is to either get extremely lucky in the draw or get very serious about physical fitness and extended range archery shooting. An ibex hunt is quite possibly the most difficult of archery hunts anywhere. Yet, your odds are greatly increased if you opt to apply for an archery season. The muzzleloader season is not nearly as difficult to draw as the once-in-a-lifetime rifle season, but it is far from easy. If you are proficient in all three weapon types, then you should apply for rifle as your first choice, muzzleloader as your second choice, and one of the archery seasons as your third choice. Remember that you will have to send off the entire tag fee at the time of application!

Find your draw odds



New Mexico's oryx breakdown
 

New Mexico oryx
Photo credit: Shutterstock

New Mexico’s oryx are extremely unique and resemble something out of Africa. Known as gemsbok in their native country, oryx are among the largest of plain’s game. Native to the arid regions of Southern Africa, the habitat found in southern New Mexico is a nearly identical. A mature oryx bull is incredibly majestic with its long horns and is considered by many to be among the very best table fare of all big game species. The large majority of oryx are hunted on the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) Unit 19 near Alamogordo and are under strict management. Prior to hunting on the WSMR, all hunters must complete a thorough check-in process and pay an additional access fee of $125. Vehicles may be searched upon arrival. Although NMGFD doesn’t require blaze orange to be worn while hunting, hunters on the WSMR as well as any guests will be required to wear orange. U.S. residents can hunt on their own, but any foreign national must be escorted at all times by an authorized MSMR official.

In addition to the oryx found on the WSMR, there are also hunts available on the McGregor Range at Fort Bliss (Unit 28). There are fewer oryx found on Unit 28 than the Unit 19, but it is still a quality hunt.

There are also several off range oryx hunts offered that have a variety of available season dates, but these are seasons with extremely low success, if any success, because the state is trying to keep the oryx numbers exclusively on the WSMR and McGregor ranges. Take caution prior to applying for any off range hunt choice.

Current oryx herd condition

Thanks to the extremely controlled environment and strict management, the oryx numbers are increasing. These animals are very prolific and have no set rut, so they can breed at any time throughout the year. In their native Africa, they have the African lion to prey on them, but in southern New Mexico, man is the only predator. It is not uncommon to see several bulls each day while in the field. The bulls grow impressive horns that can reach 30” to 40” in length. Originally intended to be exclusively on the WSMR when introduced in 1969, these oryx have extended their range throughout the WSMR, as well as off the range. Remember that harvesting an oryx off range is not as easy as on the range.

The seasons

The most desired of all the seasons is the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity in Unit 19. The Stallion Range and the Rhodes Canyon area within the WSMR offer the very best seasons and a true opportunity to harvest an amazing trophy. There are several choices with various season dates, but every season is a quality opportunity.

There are also broken-horned oryx hunts for those hunters that are interested in easier draw odds and are not against having a taxidermist repair a broken trophy.

If you are interested in an opportunity to hunt during one of the common population management hunts on the WSMR, then apply for that as a fifth choice on your application. The fifth choice will indicate that you are willing to accept a population management opportunity.

There are no muzzleloader or archery-only seasons offered. Yet, if drawn, you can select from any legal weapon.

The goHUNT hit list units for New Mexico oryx

Obviously, the premier choice would be to apply for the seasons offered in Unit 19 in either the Stallion Range or the Rhodes Canyon area. There are five of these hunt choices to select from and they range from October through February. The key is to select the dates that fit your schedule best and apply for those.

Top hunt units to consider for trophy
oryx

Unit & Season

Trophy
Potential*
Harvest
Success
Unit 19 Oct 14-16, 2016 30-40" 70%
Unit 19 Nov 11-13, 2016 30-40" 84%
Unit 19 Jan 6-8, 2017 30-40" 87%
Unit 19 Jan 20-22, 2017 30-40" 86%
Unit 19 Feb17-19, 2017 30-40" 79%
Unit 28 Dec 3-4, 2016 30-40" 67%
Unit 28 Jan 14-15, 2017 30-40" 50%

* Length of horns

 

How to uncover hidden gem oryx units

Limited choices make it difficult to really uncover any hidden gems. The best strategy would be to apply for the premier once-in-a-lifetime choices as your first and second choices, followed by a broken horn choice listed as third choice.

If you are interested in an opportunity to experience oryx hunting, then complete all of your hunt choices. Remember that the fifth choice will indicate that you are willing to participate in a population management hunt, should one become available. The population management hunts are usually antlerless since the intention is to control the herd numbers.
 


 

Managing points and expectations

Just like the rest of the species, there is no point system in place for oryx in New Mexico.

The odds of drawing a tag for oryx are low for nonresidents because the same quota applies as the other species. Be prepared to wait several years if you are applying for the premier once-in-a-lifetime choices. When the opportunity does arise and you are drawn, you will be in for a great hunt.

Find your draw odds



New Mexico's barbary sheep breakdown
 

New Mexico Barbary sheep
Photo credit: Shutterstock

The most nomadic species of the New Mexico exotics is the barbary sheep. Considered by many to be the “poor man’s bighorn,” these sheep offer a challenging hunt. In their native lands of North Africa, they were called aoudad. Although here they are called barbary sheep, they actually fall into the goat classification. The barbary sheep were first hunted with over-the-counter permits in New Mexico, but now there are some areas that are managed with tags that are offered through the big game draw. The best success is found on private ranches offered through outfitters, but there are also opportunities on public lands to hunt as a DIY experience. Remember that these herds of barbary sheep are very nomadic and will require hours of scouting to keep track of them in order to find success on your hunt. An outfitter is your best bet at success.

Current barbary sheep herd condition

The barbary sheep are doing well in New Mexico with the numbers stable to increasing. These are the most difficult of species in New Mexico to gain an accurate count because of the vast area that they cover and the difficulty in locating them. The billies harvested grow impressive horns and make for a very fulfilling hunt.

The seasons

The majority of hunters that pursue barbary sheep in New Mexico book a hunt with an outfitter on a large ranch. There is no real season associated with hunting them this way and units available are 2, 4-7, 9, 10, 12, 15, 17, 18, 19, 21, 25, 31, 33, 34, 38-59 except for the February season offered in Units 31, 34, 36, and 37. There are only three draw hunts to select from that offer a chance to hunt on public lands. The hunt choices offer dates throughout the entire month of February. If you draw a tag, then you are eligible to hunt with any legal weapon. Over-the-counter private land only hunts are in Units 32, 34, 36, 37 (Hunt Code BBY-1-200) and Units 29, 30 (Hunt Code BBY-1-201).



The goHUNT hit list units for New Mexico barbary sheep
 

New Mexico barbary sheep taken with Ridgeline Outfitters
New Mexico barbary sheep taken with Ridgeline Outfitters — A goHUNT Business Member

There are two main hunt choices that you should select from: Unit 29 and Unit 30 as well as Units 32, 34, 36, and 37. Remember that to be successful, it is best to hire an outfitter. If you plan to hunt on your own, plan to spend some time afield in search of these roaming sheep.



How to uncover hidden gem barbary sheep units

Doing research with an outfitter is the key to finding success for barbary sheep. These hunts are generally inexpensive and can be completed during the winter and spring when there are no other conflicts.
 


 

Managing points and expectations

There are no points associated with barbary sheep in New Mexico. Draw odds range from 0.07% to 41% for residents and from 0% to 18% for nonresidents

Find your draw odds

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