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What is a Landowner Tag?

A landowner tag is what gives a hunter the ability to forgo the draw in select states, which then presents hunters with an opportunity to hunt some of the nicest units that are otherwise hard to come by. The hunter who buys this tag must also redeem the voucher and pay state fees as well as tag fees. 

Many state wildlife agencies issue Landowner Vouchers to the landowners as compensation for wildlife damage claims. While there are many benefits to landowner voucher programs within individual states, along with ones unique to each state, there are also regulations that come along with these programs. 

Colorado

While there are only two types of Landowner Vouchers in the state of Colorado, some regard it as having one of the best voucher programs in the West.

Qualifications for landowners must have at least 160 continuous deeded acres that are also inhabited by wildlife, or the landowners must posses an agricultural cropland. Landowners apply for specific landowner vouchers that are good for only specific seasons. The Unit Wide Vouchers gives hunters not only the ability to hunt the otherwise private property under the given tag, but also any public ground found inside that unit. The second tag is the Private Land Only Voucher, which again, gives hunters the freedom to hunt on the private property listed for their tag. 

Arizona

Arizona has no Landowner Voucher program and will not have one in the foreseeable future.

Nevada Landowner Tags/Vouchers

In the Silver State Landowner Tags are Unit Wide Tags/Vouchers. For the hunters of Nevada, this means that not only can they hunt in within the unit under their given tag, but that they can also roam onto the property of the land owner who is under that tag.

Utah

Utah has a somewhat complicated Landowner Voucher program. The state issues Landowner Vouchers to landowners during general-season deer units if they have a 640 continuous acres of land. Each landowner has to apply for these vouchers each year in spring with the Utah division of wildlife. 

This state, like some others has two kinds of Landowner Vouchers:

Cooperative Wildlife Management Unit Tags are strictly Private Land Landowner Vouchers — These vouchers are good only for the specific CWMU ranch they were issued for. Utah-resident hunters can apply for these tags through the Utah limited entry draw or purchase them directly from the CWMU ranch operator. 

The other is a Unit Wide Landowner Voucher which gives the hunter more freedom and the ability to hunt the entire unit and property that was issued under the certain voucher. These types of landowner vouchers can prove of some good for the private property for which they were issued, as well as public lands throughout the unit they were issued in. 

Utah also offers conservation permits that allow hunters who purchase them from conservation groups to hunt some of the state’s popular and limited entry units.

New Mexico

This may also be considered one of the better Landowner Voucher programs in the west. 

Some larger landowners work with biologists to better determine the number of animals using their perspective land each year. 

These biologists determine the number of landowner vouchers issued to these landowners each year. The number of Landowner Vouchers come consistently each year. Smaller contributing ranches, however, enter a lottery draw to determine what tags if any they will receive each year. There are two types of Landowner Vouchers in New Mexico. 

The most common, and popular are the Unit Wide Landowner Vouchers that allow hunters to hunt public land as well as any private land of a landowner who is issued any Unit Wide Landowner Vouches that year. The second Landowner Voucher is a ranch-only tag which only allows hunters to hunt the specific ranch for which the tag was issued.

Oregon Landowner Vouchers/Tags

Oregon has Private Land Only Landowner Tags/Vouchers for elk and deer. The state also has Outfitter Allocated Tags/Vouchers for elk and deer.

What is a Trespass Hunt?

A Trespass Hunt is a self-guided hunt, which can prove to be a helpful and interesting alternative for hunters who may be working on a budget. New Mexico, Idaho, Utah and Colorado offer these less-expensive hunts.

CWMU Hunts in Utah?

Cooperative Wildlife Management Unit in Utah has given access to over some two million acres worth of private land over to the public. With the CWMU, the state receives numerous advantages within its financial system and wildlife. Landowners may want to keep holding onto their various private lands, though. Wildlife are not overrun in these areas, it is just their habitat. This can also be good for sportsmen, giving them better odds and little amount of other hunters to take on. 

3 Comments

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Peter Lotz_10203542259110941
Peter L. - posted 4 years ago on 05-26-2015 12:59:07 pm
Lake City Florida

All the public hunting land is being bought up and another hunting camp . Florida needs help with WMA. To many people shoot young small deer. I'm trying to find places to hunt but who can afford $ 5000.
a person to hunt deer. Now theirs price ranges to hunt deer , turkey , hogs. I remember when I was younger you just drive in the woods early morning and you'll see a nice buck or two. I spend all year looking and having my trail cameras stolen and then I don't get a permit. We have had 13 trail cameras stolen just last year. People just have no respect for others or the sport of hunting. Shooting a deer over by a feeder isn't hunting. I believe in stock and hunt. This way you teach your kids how to track look for signs. We tried a ground blind but that was a very scary day. Getting shot at during bow season. If we find a great spot we will get into a tree stand, (15 to 20 ft from the ground).
It would be so awesome to hunt a ranch owners land. That's not happening in Florida. I was talking to a man yesterday that wanted $4500 to hunt one hog and if I wanted a trophy hog that's another $1500. I've hunted all over from P.A , N.Y, N.C, S.C and Georgia before I was married and the most I paid was $200 or share my deer with the owner. All these T.V shows are making it very hard for the average person to hunt.

Brady J. Miller
Brady M. - posted 5 years ago on 08-28-2014 04:21:09 pm
Las Vegas, NV
goHUNT Team

Thanks for reaching out Morgan. You can always ask questions here or send us an email. Wyoming's landowner tags are only valid for the ranch owner, family members, or ranch staff. They are not sellable on the secondary market. I hope that helps answer your question. Please let us know if there is anything else we can help you with.

Morgan b. - posted 5 years ago on 08-28-2014 11:07:09 am
Evanston, wyoming
goHUNT INSIDER

What about wyoming do they do anything like this? Is there where I ask questions?